New things in the recycling and buzz-phrase departments…

My shallow-but-wide net has pulled in a few interesting items today.

Indestructables (source of last year’s laundry balls and bath bombs…no ordinary hand-made gifts leave this address) has come up with a list of things to do with dud discs, of which I have way more than I need since I haven’t found a recycler in central Florida that will accept them and mailing them to a recycling facility just doesn’t strike me as a rational, cost-effective solution to the problem.  Most of their forty suggestions seem only a little better than mailing the discs to New Jersey, but a few have promise….

Driveway reflectors and backyard bird-scaring mobiles

Of course, I don’t have a driveway or backyard, but the condo parking lot does have some dark spots at night and who knows what I could accomplish by attaching dud discs to the dumpsters?

Today’s buzz-phrase might turn out to be more useful in the long term: Filter Bubble.

Eli Pariser—a man with whom I do not always agree but always find worth listening to—defines filter bubble as the way the combination of convenience and personalization on the Internet shape the information we rely on to make decisions in the 21st century.  Apparently, what Google shows me when I search for “BP” isn’t necessarily what its going to show someone else.  On a trivial level, this may account for why my dad insists he can’t get Google to find the things on the Internet that I know Google can easily find, but on a deeper level, my gut tells me the filter bubble is real.

I use No-Script religiously and disable pretty much all the tracking beacons I can track down (including Google’s latest “Instant Search” innovations), but I know I’m not invisible.  Until today, that really hadn’t bothered me all that much—aside from a few long alpha-numeric strings, I don’t have much to hide.  But now I’m starting to think about how my quest for knowledge is biasing the very knowledge I seek.   The filter bubble probably doesn’t matter when I’m on the prowl for Mithras, but what’s it doing when I’m trying to figure out how to vote on Amendment 4?

3 comments to New things in the recycling and buzz-phrase departments…

  • smartcat

    Is there any way I can get the instructions for the laundry balls? I thought I saved it, but didn’t!
    thanks.

    • Lynn

      The original website-source for my dryer ball experiments seems to have gone dark. But I found this one that has pretty much the same information
      http://paintedthreadsprojects.blogspot.com/2008/10/making-felted-balls.html

      I’m not a spinner so I didn’t have a roving stash in need of shrinking. I worked with plain wool yarn instead (Patton’s I think — Joanne’s had large skeins on sale. I pretty much cleaned them out.)

      It would probably be easier to work with roving than yarn. Or maybe if you have your own washer and dryer, which I don’t. We have a community laundry here at Spanish Oaks and it costs a dollar a load to wash or dry. Worse, one wash wasn’t enough to get the balls felted and one spin through the dryer wasn’t nearly enough to get them dry. I wound up boiling them on the stove in a big Dutch oven, about 15 minutes per batch of six balls, then I dried them in the microwave. Using the microwave as a dryer was very thorough, but a little dicey — I dried four at a time, in four minute bursts and it took FOREVER (I was worried about what would happen, though, if I didn’t get the balls dry to the core).

      After the first batch, I did the rest in layers — it actually took less time to dry them that way. (How did I know the ball was thoroughly dry? Dry balls don’t smell like wet sheep…)

      All in all, I like what came out at the finished end, though I think, if I were to do it over, I’d purchase a goodly amount of plain, undyed roving to start the process.

  • smartcat

    Thanks, this should do the trick! There’s some pretty stuff there……sc